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Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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Noah's Arc PICSPAM!!! [Aug. 22nd, 2009|02:53 am]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

g0shawk
Hi! I just finished watching the show & movie, and I love Noah's Arc! Y'all have probably seen all these photos before, but I thought I'd link here anyway since I don't know anyone else who watches the show.



Rest of the pics HERE at my journal :)
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old article i wrote on the youth and noah's arc [May. 1st, 2009|06:05 pm]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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In the groundbreaking Logo feature film Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom,
fans are introduced to 19-year-old Brandon, Ricky's latest fling and
Chance Counter's college student. For the first time in the series,
gay youth is acknowledged. Brandon's character deals with issues
facing openly gay youth such as acceptance from family and self,
promiscuity, sexual roles, masculinity and femininity and the prospect
of lasting monogamy. Although brief and maybe even unfinished
Brandon's plight, like so many gay youth, is finally given a real life
interpretation. Jumping the Broom is a beacon of hope for gay youth
serving up examples that one day gay marriage will be accepted
nationwide, while fighting against the stereotypes of gay promiscuity.
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Noah arc DVD has arrived! [Feb. 1st, 2009|08:31 am]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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The DVD is now available on amazon.com or logo online.
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feb 3rd [Jan. 3rd, 2009|06:58 pm]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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I was browsing LOGO.com when I came across some news on the release of Noah's Arc The Movie: "Jumping the Broom," it's hitting stores and logo's shipping copies out on Feb 3rd. They have two different version you can pay $24.99 and get the movie along with the soundtrack or you can just pay $19.99 and get the movie. I myself love the music and movie so I'll be buying both. But i just wanted to share that news with all Noah's Arc fans. Also if you want to make sure you have it before it back stocks you can go to:Noah's Arc - Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom [WS] [DVD/CD] Darryl Stephens / DVD / R / 2008 and pre-order it now. Below I've include the trailer just for the people who aren't familiar with Noahs Arc. That is all.
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(no subject) [Nov. 2nd, 2008|03:47 pm]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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Noah's Arc Screening in More Cities [Oct. 30th, 2008|11:06 pm]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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From Patrik:

"Noah's Arc" opens in Detroit, Houston, and other cities on November 7th! Go to NoahsArcMovie.com for theaters, tickets and showtimes! Order the soundtrack now on LOGOonline.com.
And if you're anywhere near LA, NYC, CHICAGO, ATLANTA or DC, go check out the movie this weekend!
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(no subject) [Oct. 30th, 2008|07:52 pm]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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MEET THE BLACK CARRIE BRADSHAW [Oct. 29th, 2008|09:24 am]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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OGO’s Noah’s Arc makes the jump to the big screen—showing a completely different African-American experience

By Armond White


Noah’s Arc: Jumping the Broom
Directed by Patrik-Ian Polk
Running Time: 101 min.


Noah’s Arc is the revolutionary TV show that the mainstream media ignored, preferring the cynical clichés of The Wire. Not even two highly rated seasons on Viacom’s flagship gay cable channel LOGO could guarantee a third life for a series that pampered young gay black men the way HBO’s Sex and the City cosseted rich white women. So writer-director Patrik-Ian Polk did the next best thing and channeled his imagination into the feature-length film Noah’s Arc: Jumping the Broom.

Yet not all is triumph. Jumping the Broom was only screened for critics on a rough, work-print DVD—not color-corrected, still bearing copyright watermarks, onscreen ADR codes and subtitles for dialogue dubbing. As if Polk’s brainchild hasn’t been marginalized enough, even its distributor and publicists sought to marginalize it even further. This demands mention for two reasons: 1) Beware the print quality in theaters. 2) Polk’s satisfactory entertainment seems doomed by systemic opposition to its uniqueness, what pop-culture academics used to call “Difference.”

Noah’s Arc’s quartet of young black men counteracts the prevailing image of gayness as a young, rich, white male phenomenon. The title refers to Noah (Darryl Stephens), an L.A.-based aspiring screenwriter whose love and social life resist Hollywood storybook cliché. Noah may dress in couture like Carrie Bradshaw (he enters Jumping wearing a Russian toque, cape and calf-high boots) but his style is provocative; he flouts ideas about masculinity, blackness and class. If you accept Noah (his gentle, gazelle-like demeanor stresses effeminacy), his friends still test your tolerance: Chance (Doug Spearman) is a snooty, over-enunciating university professor; Alex (Rodney Chester) is a plus-sized drama queen who likes to cook when not dispensing counsel at a gay men’s health center; and Rickey (Christian Vincent) is incorrigibly promiscuous.

All these characters are dark-skinned except for Ricky, whose light (possibly Latino) complexion gives him social advantages—such as racially determined sex appeal, which he squanders in self-destructive ways. Yet Polk’s affection for these characters equals his determination to validate them. (The performances have gained substance; even a “voguing” sequence is in character.) Like ABC-TV’s 1977 production of Roots, Noah’s Arc acquaints viewers with aspects of African-American character and experience that are usually hidden or ignored. Noah and friends inhabit a parallel universe to the whites-only stereotypes of West Hollywood and Chelsea. When they discuss the image tyranny of pop figures Terrell Owens and Fitty Cent, they articulate stress all men feel. Ethicized pioneers always perform this breakthrough in the arts. Disrespect and discredit is the price they pay—whether it’s Noah’s Arc being screened like a B-movie, or Wong Kar Wai’s profound gay Asian love story in Happy Together being denied the acclaim given Brokeback Mountain.

Jumping the Broom tests the supposed openness of gay culture by the casual way it celebrates Noah’s identity. Noah’s wedding to straight-acting Wade (Jensen Atwood) takes place in Martha’s Vineyard, down the road from P. Diddy’s estate—a rare admission of black class advancement. This revelation continues with Noah’s persistent suitor Baby Gat (Jason Steed), a closeted British rapper whose wealth and suave machismo broadens gay stereotypes. The film’s implicit sponsorship of gay marriage follows its extensive view of black society and genuine endorsement of African-American tradition (such as the ceremonial broom-jumping, an ethnic marriage ritual dating from slavery that symbolizes community).

When each man’s relationship is undermined by his own insecurity, the interplay of frustrated attraction and bewildering passion is more sophisticated than Noah’s Arc’s formulaic second season. It evokes the insight of Q. Allan Brocka (who wrote last year’s excellent Boy Culture and the groundbreaking LOGO puppet-animation series Rick & Steve: The Happiest Couple in All the World). Brocka, the cleverest, most unheralded screenwriter in pop, helped Polk devise Jumping’s farcical plot twists. A new character, Brandon (Gary Leroy Gray), Ricky’s twenty-something trick who was also Chance’s student, pushes against the clique’s tenuous, desperate privilege. Struggling with coming out to his parents and the confusions of out-gay life, Brandon asks, “Is this all there is to being gay—being a slut who can’t say no or being bitter and pretending you’re happy?”

Basic questions of human happiness have a different ring in this context than they did in Boys in the Band (1970) and Love! Valor! Compassion! (1999) because Polk and Brocka don’t take social privilege for granted. Their humor poses a radical re-take on mainstream virtues: Wade complains to his shocked bourgie mother, “It’d be easier telling you I was an axe murderer,” which connects to the campy defiance of Alex calling his African foster child “O.J., short for Ojomodupe.” Polk uses different (radical) examples of love, valor and compassion. That these marginalized men don’t acquiesce to the mainstream’s oppressive morality is confirmed in the measured vows Noah and Wade exchange. They seek an answer to male companionship that redefines love and sex. Describing “a fear and yearning beyond lust,” Noah breaks past the superficial blandishments typically used to attract, sell and distract gay audiences from their truest well-being.

Polk has more in mind than the LOGO idea of placating a potential market. Jumping the Broom exalts an underserved audience yet Polk’s discussion of the socio-economic connection of slavery and contemporary gay politics doesn’t patronize them. (“It’s gonna take more than love to save the day,” Alex advises young Brandon.) Almost 20 years ago when Marlon Rigg’s poetry-doc Tongues Untied aired on PBS, its scandalous theme “Black men loving black men is the revolutionary act of the 21st century”) sparked a National
Endowment for the Arts funding controversy. Now, Polk’s fulfillment of Riggs’ proposal gets less attention than the spectacle of ghetto miseries in the TV series The Wire—stereotypes our culture is comfortable with.

Against that, Jumping the Broom offers a subtler revolution: The snap of Ricky telling Brandon: “I’m too old to be mind-fucked and you’re too young to do it.” The image of Noah tenderly braiding Wade’s hair into cornrows breaks masculine tradition—but it also makes history.
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Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom Scores Stunning Opening Weekend Gross of $161,302 on Five Screens [Oct. 28th, 2008|08:14 pm]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

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NEW YORK, Oct 27, 2008 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Platformed independent release based on popular television series rivals other indies for opening weekend box office on half the screens; Logo quickly securing additional screens for second weekend
Logo, a division of Viacom Inc.'s (NYSE: VIA and VIA.B) MTV Networks, today announced the romantic comedy Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom, soared to the top of U.S. theatrical independent film box office with an estimated opening weekend gross of $161,302, or approximately $32,261 per screen. Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom is the theatrical film debut of Logo Features presented in association with Tall Skinny Black Boy Productions.
Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom grossed approximately $54,093 on Friday, increased slightly to approximately $55,209 on Saturday, and is expected to gross an estimated additional $52,000 on Sunday. The enormous audience response to the film's opening weekend is prompting Logo Features to add screens for the film's second weekend.
"We're thrilled that Noah fans and newcomers to this story are packing theaters to see Logo's first feature film and the first theatrical release based on a gay TV series," said Lisa Sherman, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Logo. "The stellar box office for Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom says as much about the intense loyalty of Noah's avid fan base as it does about ticket sales."
Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom is a sassy, funny and fierce look at the lives of a close-knit quartet of African-American gay men who discovered their real family when they found each other. Ticket information and video previews are available at www.NoahsArcMovie.com and the motion picture soundtrack is now available in stores nationwide from Tommy Boy's Silver Label.
When Noah (Darryl Stephens), a young screenwriter from Los Angeles, agrees to marry his partner Wade (Jensen Atwood) in a small ceremony on Martha's Vineyard, he invites his three closest friends, Alex (Rodney Chester), Ricky (Christian Vincent) and Chance (Doug Spearman) to travel cross-country with them for a weekend of revelry. What he gets instead is a weekend of revelations where secrets and lies are exposed, hearts are challenged and friendships are turned upside down. Based on Logo Network's landmark television series, Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom is a sexy, funny and often insightful celebration of love, family, friendship and self-discovery.
Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom stars Darryl Stephens, Rodney Chester, Doug Spearman, Christian Vincent, Jensen Atwood, Gregory Kieth (Mista Nice Guy), Jonathan Julian ("In Justice"), Jason Steed ("The Bill"), Gary LeRoi Gray (Bring It On: All or Nothing) and Tonya Pinkins (Enchanted), with a special appearance by legendary singer-songwriter Phoebe Snow. Patrik-Ian Polk (Punks) directs from a script he co-wrote with John R. Gordon. Producers are Lael McCall ("Whistler"), Carol Ann Shine (The Human Contract) and Patrik Ian Polk.
Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom is executive produced by Noreen Halpern ("Whistler"), Dave Mace ("Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows"), John Morayniss ("The Best Years") and Pamela Post ("Rick and Steve, the Happiest Gay Couple in All the World"). The director of photography is Christopher Porter. The costume designer is Kate Rose. The music supervisors are Barry Cole and Patrik Ian Polk. Noah's Arc: Jumping the Broom is distributed by Logo Features. The film is rated R by the MPAA for sexual content and language.
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The Movie [Oct. 27th, 2008|10:58 pm]
Logo's hottest new series Noah's Arc

scorpiohoney12
[Current Mood |bouncybouncy]

I just got back from the movie and plan to see it at least 2 more times plus buy the DVD in December! YAY!
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